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The Best Way to Handle Anxiety When Traveling

how to handle anxiety and stress when traveling

I love traveling. Wait, scratch that. I love being in new places. But, getting there? Not so much. Despite the fact that I cross the ocean at least a couple times a year, I still have a long list of worries that always seem to come along for the ride. Whether it’s a fear of flying, heights, unknown places or crowds of people, we all have moments that make us feel anything but calm, cool and collected. Nevertheless, we would never be able to see the world if we continued to let out fears block the way. Here are my favorite tricks and tips that can help ease the transition out of your comfort zone.

Plan Ahead
While we’ve heard it a million times that if you fail to plan you plan to fail (hello, 11th grade math teacher’s motto), it’s the truth. Make sure you have itineraries, tickets and times printed out and/or easily accessible on your phone. I prefer to highlight key data I might need when I’m rushing through a security line, such as my flight’s confirmation code. While having the information is key, run through your plan a few times in your head to ease your worries and determine the best way to execute. Imagine yourself landing in a new city and attempting to get to your hostel. Taxi, uber, public transportation? Play it out in your mind to familiarize yourself with your procedure. I read about how Michael Phelp’s does this before a race: plan each second accordingly and then act on habit rather than spur of the moment. Worked for him, didn’t it?

Give Yourself Extra Time
Nothing is more anxiety-inducing than being rushed for time. If you’ve planned out your day (see above), then you can take into account the distance between places and how much extra time you need to have. And be honest with yourself, if you tend to linger around and walk slowly, you might need more time than someone who is a power walking champ.

Occupy Your Mind
However, being early also means you have time to mull over horrible possibilities for whatever adventure you’re heading to. Instead of replaying the plane crash in Cast Away over and over again in your mind, bring some reading material on a subject more soothing to the soul. Perhaps listen to an uplifting podcast or read a funny memoir (Tina Fey, for the win), anything that will allow the time to pass while also taking your mind away from simmering worries.

Yoga Sequence
Shocker! Yoga made it onto the list. Flow through a quick vinyasa (sign up for my email list to get a free guide!) to calm your nerves and center your mind. If you’re in a public place and not willing to downward dog in crowds, find yourself a comfortable seat and slowly count your inhale and exhales. Otherwise known as pranayama, controlling the breath slows down your breathing which can speed up if you’re worried or anxious. Try breathing in for five counts, holding for two, then exhaling for eight. repeat as necessary to bring your awareness back internally and away from external concerns.

Essential Oils
Essentials oils have been around for centuries to help various health issues without the side effects of medicine. Lavender helps reduce serum cortisol, clary sage clears the mind and rose settles your emotions. Put a drop of the oil of your favorite on your wrist before your next event and breath it in deeply. Just as a courtesy, I would avoid using oils in tight areas. Just because you want to zen, doesn’t necessarily mean your neighbor does.

Journal
Releasing your concerns in a journal allows them to leave your mind and be entered onto paper. Although this is easier said than done, often times we hold onto feelings we don’t even realize we have. By writing down even the smallest worry, we acknowledge that it exists, recognize how to overcome it, and then move on. By letting it fester inside, it only adds more and more pressure to an already stressful situation. If journaling isn’t your thing, try writing postcards to friends and family. Simply channeling your creative self can help calm you down.

Avoid the News
This one took me awhile to understand. the more bad things I read about in the news, the more likely I thought that they could happen to me. It’s important to be informed, yes, but watching the fifth news segment on the disasters of the day isn’t going to contribute to your life. In fact, I found that the more I watched the news, the more elaborate the made up scenarios in my head got. Stick to positive outlets, or uplifting fictional texts instead.

How do you calm your anxiety?

Xx,

Juliette

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namastaytraveling

Welcome to Namastay Traveling! I'm Juliette, a 20-something certified yogi living in Washington, D.C. Follow along as I share my travel adventures while striving to achieve mindfulness along the way. Here you'll find helpful travel itineraries along with ways to practice peace while abroad. The adventurer in me honors the adventurer in you.

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