Why You Need to Visit Wicklow Mountains National Park, Ireland

why you need to visit Wicklow Mountains National Park in Ireland

While Dublin has much to offer as far as the Irish experience, to truly get a taste of this magnificent country you need to venture outside of the city borders. While the Cliffs of Moher are a popular choice, a cloudy day could leave you seeing little more than two feet in front of you, no cliffs in sight. Not willing to risk an entire day crossing the country only to see our own breath, we opted to experience the Garden of Ireland, one of the Ireland’s six national park with unique boglands, heather fields and infamous movie locations (P.S. I Love You anyone?).

As an easy day trip, the Wicklow Mountain Tour not only takes you through the country side to the park, but also stops at a monastic site and enchanting Irish villages along the way to get a peek into the world beyond Dublin.

Avoca Handweavers in Kilmacanogue in Wicklow Mountains Tour from Dublin
Avoca Handweavers in Kilmacanogue

The tour started early to make sure we would be able to fit in all the sights. Luckily, our first stop was at Avoca Handweavers in Kilmacanogue. A quaint restaurant, tea shop and homemade craft shop surrounded by luscious gardens gave us some much-needed caffeine for the rest of the day.

Bridge Creek in P.S. I Love You in Wicklow Mountains Tour from Dublin
Creek in P.S. I Love You

We then headed off into the mountains of Wicklow. There are numerous routes to take through the mountains that will lead to valleys, sprawling wildflower fields and of course, the bridge at Dublin Bay at Sandcover where Holly and Gerry kissed in P.S. I Love You. Even if you haven’t seen the movie, the bridge is still a magnificent structure in the midst of a trickling creek and purply-green landscapes. You can also relieve some of the scenes from Braveheart and Reign of Fire in the fields of SallyGap.

Road through Wicklow Mountains
Road through Wicklow Mountains

Next, we trekked to Glencree Valley to see Guinness Lake (Lough Tay) and hear of folklore and myths of the area. Sure to its name, the lake looks like a dark glass a Guinness from above. I won’t spoil any surprises here, but the stories of the rolling hills and boglands only add to the enchanting nature of the park.

Lough Tay and Guinness Lake in wicklow mountains
Lough Tay (Guinness Lake)

After we’d gotten enough of recreating our favorite films, we refueled in a traditional Irish village called Glencullen for a hearty lunch. As a vegetarian, my options were a bit limited, so I stuck to some side dishes and a Clif bar I had packed. Though, my meat-loving boyfriend gave the meal a thumbs up!

Walk to Glendalough Upper Lake in Wicklow Mountains
Walk to Glendalough Upper Lake

Once we were filled up with lunch and another pint of Guinness (obviously), we drove down to Glendalough, noted as a glorious “jewel in the crown of the Wicklow Mountains”. Along the way, we passed by a quaint village no larger than a block or two where actor Daniel Day-Lewis currently resides (any Abe Lincoln fans?). Once we arrived to the starting location, we began at the upper lake and took an easy hike down to the Glendalough monastic settlement to learn about St. Kevin, the founder of the ancient monastery.

Upper Lake in Glendalough on Wicklow Mountains Tour
Upper Lake in Glendalough

As a cemetery enthusiast (anyone else?), I am absolutely captivated by reading old grave stones and learning about the people who inhabited this land centuries before me. Although it might just be a creepy interest of mine, the site is worth seeing even for those who aren’t as fascinated with the gravestones of others. This 10th century monastic round tower settlement in Glendalough still has the remnants of buildings along with a round tower you can peer into that was once used as a guard tower. The heavy stones and detailed inscriptions are a beautiful contrast to the lust gardens that surround the area. Luckily, our tour guide was extremely knowledgeable and able to answer any questions we had.

Glendalough Monastic Settlement on Wicklow Mountains Tour
Glendalough Monastic Settlement

As the ending note to our tour, it was only fitting that we all enjoyed a shot of whiskey and made our way back to Dublin.

Have you been to the Wicklow Mountains? Do you prefer to explore urban areas or venture out into the country side?

xx,
Juliette

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Top Five Things to Do In Dublin, Ireland

top five things to do in dublin ireland

Unlike most people, Ireland was not a country that had ever topped my travel list. Sure, I’d seen the incredible pictures of its sprawling mountainous landscape and the large foamy pours of Guinness, but, I had other a lot of other items to check off first. That is, however, until I realized the due to it’s location, a flight from D.C. to Dublin wasn’t only affordable, but one might even say, cheap. Seriously. Willing to be flexible with our dates and travel times, we could cross the pond for less than $400, round trip. Sign me up! Suddenly I was a HUGE Ireland advocate. Plus, at clocking in at approximately five hours, the relatively quick flight didn’t take up too much of our precious exploration time.

Temple Bar, Dublin, Ireland
Temple Bar, Dublin, Ireland

Although there is so much more to see on all regions of this country, today we’re just going to focus on the top five things you must see or do when you visit the capital of the Republic of Ireland, Dublin. This dynamic city offers attractions for everyone’s interests. You could easily spend a week here seeking out the crowded, dark pubs or strolling through the open gardens.

We opted to stay in the heart of the city at Blooms Hotel. A cheeky building built above a popular nightclub. However, lucky for us, the nightclub is only open on weekends and since we were staying Tuesday through Thursday, we wouldn’t have to rock ourselves to sleep with pumping EDM. The intricate graffiti sprawled across the building looks like something in a museum. The gorgeous colors and designs make in stand out even in the Temple Bar neighborhood known for its various spectacles. Most importantly, Blooms Hotel allows for easy access to all areas of the city. While there are many attractions you’ll witness on your walks through the winding roads and cobblestone alleys, such as Jame Joyce’s House and Ha’Penny Bridge, these are the top five places you must make sure to visit.

library in Trinity College in Dublin Ireland
Trinity College Library

Trinity College
As the university of Dublin, this bustling college is in the heart of the city. While walking on the green and through the old stone building are enjoyable, the main attraction is the old library and Book of Kells (Side note: I had to look this one up. The Book of Kells consists of four gospels of the New Testament in Latin). Given the long lines, it’s best to buy your tickets ahead of time here. While you should certainly have your camera ready when you first enter the vast library to capture the infinite rows of books, put your camera away to take time to read though the shelves available and soak in the knowledge that is stored here. It can be more powerful than when viewed through your lens.

St. Stephen's Green in Dublin Ireland
St. Stephen’s Green

St. Stephen’s Green
A rather long but pleasant walk from Trinity College, St. Stephen’s Green is best seen around lunch time if you want to fit in like a local. Grab a sandwich at one of the shops close by *(fried fish is also a favorite) and find a spot to enjoy the fresh gardens, trickling fountains and prime people-watching. This public park is one of Dublin’s main Georgian garden squares and is right next to the Stephen’s Green Shopping Centre and Iveagh House, other sites worth a peak for their notable architecture.

St. Patrick's Cathedral

St. Patrick’s Cathedral
The tallest and largest church in Ireland, St. Patrick’s Cathedral is breathtaking both inside and out. While you can attend various functions held at the church, a tour through the structure was fulfilling enough. As the heart of Dublin’s history and culture for centuries, it is recognized as being one of the most vital pilgrimage sites. Even just walking about the greens surrounding the cathedral and taking in the red tulips lining the sidewalks is enough to understand the significance this building had on Dublin as well as Ireland.

Gravity Bar in Guinness Storehouse in Dublin Ireland
Gravity Bar, Guinness Storehouse

Guinness Storehouse
Although the storehouse is farther away from the city center, it is more than worth the trek to the outskirts of Dublin. If you’re looking for a simply brewery tour, it’s best to turn around now. The Guinness Storehouse is a giant warehouse that holds some of the most unique beer-based experiences. Ever. Be ready to be blown away by dynamic exhibits that test all of your senses. From a scent bar, to personalized video exhibits all the way to becoming a certified Guinness Pourer, there isn’t much that isn’t here. Plan to spend a few hours exploring the actual museum-like portion and another hour enjoying a cold one on the rooftop bar, Gravity Bar, with 360 degree aerial views.

Live music in Temple Bar dublin ireland
Live music in Temple Bar

Temple Bar
Nothing compliments a visit to the Guinness Storehouse quite like more Guinness. Temple Bar is the hip and edgy neighborhood in Dublin that provides just that. It is often noted as the cultural quarter of the city, with its live street shows and active nightlife. After enjoying some local favorites at an intimate bar in the area, we spent the next few hours listening to the live shows on the street corners. More than a guy drumming buckets on the streets of NYC, these shows shut down roads and gather crowds by the 100s as everyone tries to peak at the next up and coming singer. It’s easy to make a night of it without even stepping inside a club. Better yet, after a Guinness or two or four, we were able to walk a couple block back to home base, The Blooms Hotel to get ready for the adventure to follower.

Having explored the ins and outs of Dublin, stay tuned as we head out into the Wicklow Mountains to see a whole other side of this diverse country.

Have you ever been to Dublin? Which coast is your favorite in Ireland? Dublin or the Cliffs of Moher?

xx,
Juliette

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